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All Electives (By Subject)

​Here are the Grade 9-12 electives sorted by subject. For more information on how to choose electives, or how many to pick by grade level, visit our "how to register" page or talk to student services. Click the links below to jump to that subject.

Applied Commerce Education

Accounting Essentials 30S (ACE30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Accounting Essentials will provide students the opportunity to gain an understanding of basic accounting concepts and principles.  With an emphasis on accounting for a service business, students will apply their knowledge and skills to complete the stages of the accounting cycle.

Accounting Essentials provides the fundamentals of accounting and would be a good choice for students wishing to pursue finance studies in Accounting Systems 40S.  Students interested in pursuing post-secondary studies in any business discipline will benefit considerably by completing this course.  It is also a desirable course option for future entrepreneurs or any individual who will need to know basic business money management and financial bookkeeping.

Accounting Systems 40S (AS40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Accounting 30S

Accounting 40S is an extension of the material studied in Accounting Essentials 30S with an introduction to financial analysis and corporate accounting.  With an emphasis on accounting for a merchandising business, students will apply their knowledge and skills to complete the stages of the accounting cycle.

Accounting Essentials and Accounting Systems, when completed at the high school level, gives students a significant advantage when participating in business and commerce programs at the post-secondary level.  The skills acquired are not only useful when pursuing a career in business and/or accounting, but essential for everyday life.  

Business Communications 30S (BC30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none

Communication in business requires a unique set of skills as the majority of your time is spent interacting and communicating with others.

Business Communications will focus on communication skills and techniques that are essential in business.  This course will focus on developing effective written, verbal, interpersonal and visual communication skills.  With an emphasis on technology infusion, students will learn how to use current technologies to create communications that are clear, concise and designed for business.

Business Communications is designed for students interested in pursuing post secondary studies in the business field.  It is also a desirable course option for future entrepreneurs or any individual who wants to develop effective workplace communication skills.

Business Innovations (BI10S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none

What is a business and how do they operate?  Are you interested in one day starting your own business?  Do you want to learn how businesses affect your everyday life?

Business Innovations offers students the opportunity to explore commerce related topics such as economics, entrepreneurship, business, marketing, technology and finance.  Throughout the course, students will apply the concepts and strategies they learn to a variety of creative business projects and/or simulations.

Business Innovations is designed to appeal to students who are curious about exploring the world of business and everything it has to offer; it is the suggested introduction to all of the other courses offered in the Applied Commerce Education subject area.

Creative Promotions 20S (CRP20S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none

How does a business or brand grab your attention?  What promotional and advertising strategies are used to communicate with consumers?

Creative Promotions will provide students the opportunity to develop an understanding of promotional communication from both a theoretical and practical approach.  The course focuses on concepts and principles related to promotional communication including advertising strategies, direct marketing, personal selling, sales promotions, and public relations. Students will have the opportunity to apply the concepts and their creativity to design a variety of promotional and advertising material.

Creative Promotions is designed to appeal to students who are looking to further expand their business knowledge.

Economic Principles 40S (ECP40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none

The economy is considered to be one of the most important external factors affecting one's personal and financial decisions. Do you have a good understanding of how our economic system works and your role in it?

Economic Principles focuses on both micro influences and macroeconomic principles including systems and structures, supply and demand, market influences, the global market and decision making related to economic factors.  This course is designed for students wanting to learn more about how the economy impacts their personal and business decisions at a local, national and global level.  Students will learn more about their role in the economy and how economic conditions affect the short and long-term decision making.

Economic Principles is designed for everyone as we are all participants in our economic system.  This course would also be an excellent starting point for any student interested in furthering their studies in the area of: business, accounting or economics.

Entrepreneurship 20S (E20S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none

Entrepreneurship focuses on developing the foundational skills and ideas needed to plan and develop a business.  Many students are involved in their communities and beginning to recognize the various needs and wants.  The course will begin by evaluating innovation, invention, and innovative ideas.  Students will learn the process of planning, marketing, and implementing a venture.

Entrepreneurship is a course designed to appeal to any student who has an interest in business and wants to explore entrepreneurship!

Lancer Credit Union (LWP20S, LWB30S, LWT40S - 1 Credit Each)

Dakota will be partnering with Casera Credit Union to operate a student run credit union called Lancer Credit Union within the school. Students can apply to participate in this unique course to earn Career Development credits.

The following Career Development curriculum documents will be used dependent on the students' grade level:

  • Life/Work Planning (Grade 10)
  • Life/Work Building (Grade 11)
  • Life/Work Transitioning (Grade 12)

This course will provide participating students with the opportunity to:

  • Develop a working knowledge of the banking system from a credit union perspective
  • Develop a variety of workplace skills including: risk-taking, decision-making, money-management, business organization, rules of order, marketing and promotions, and time management
  • Develop deep learning skills like character, citizenship, collaboration, critical thinking, creativity and communication skills

Units of study include: Personal Management, Career Exploration, Learning and Planning, Job Seeking and Job Maintenance and Career and Community Experiences.

Marketing and Digital Commerce 40S (MDC40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none

What is marketing?  Marketing involves a lot more than meets the eye; it includes a variety of strategies designed to get a product to the consumer.

Marketing and Digital Commerce will provide students the opportunity to develop an understanding of marketing activities from both a theoretical and practical approach.  The course focuses on applying marketing concepts, principles, and strategies in making decisions related to product, price, place, and promotion.  Students will have the opportunity to apply the concepts and their creativity through hands on applications and the creation of a marketing plan.

Marketing and Digital Commerce is designed to appeal to students who are looking to further expand their business knowledge.

Personal Finance 20S (PF20S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none

Personal finance skills are essential: how do we effectively manage our personal finances so that we can reach our short-term and long-term goals?

Personal Finance focuses on developing fundamental financial literacy skills, including the value of money, basic economics, budgeting, saving, financial institution services and investing.  Many high school students will get their first part-time job while in school or are starting to dream about future purchases that require financial planning such as buying a car, travelling or pursuing a post-secondary education.  It is a good option for any student interested in learning more about how to make good personal financial decisions.

Financial literacy is a life skill so this course is designed for everyone.  This course is an excellent starting point for any student interested in furthering their studies in the area of: business, accounting or economics.

Visual Art

Intellectual curiosity, creative insight, and self-motivation are essential ingredients to art making and attaining success in the higher levels of Visual Arts. The Visual Arts program encourages self-expression, creative problem solving, and awareness and appreciation for Art within society. 

Cost: There is a compulsory fee of $20.00 for each art course. This fee is to be paid to the student’s art teacher during the first week of the course.

Visual Art 10S (VA10S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

This course deals with the study of various artistic media and an exploration of ideas or meaning which is central to artistic expression. Students will create several projects as a result of an artistic inquiry process. The course will deal with three aspects of art: artistic literacy (look at and explain art), creative expression (creating art) and responding to art. Students will learn to solve and to analyze creative problems in a visual form, with a variety of media. Activities at this level will be primarily teacher directed. 

Visual Art 20S (VA20S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

The essential learning areas in art are: Art Language and Tools, Understanding Art in Context, Creative Expression in Art, and Valuing Artistic Experience. These aspects will help your growth as an artist and as an artful learner. Activities at this level are primarily teacher directed and will explore the dynamics of Visual Art through; various media, research of Artists and genres, and self reflection as an artist. Students must have an open mind and a willingness to try new ideas and techniques.

Visual Art 30S (VA30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Art 20S 

This course encourages a collaborative approach between student and teacher. The focus of this program is on student initiative. At this level, artists should be displaying individual expression of ideas and greater competency in using media. Artists will essentially build on the introduced essential learning areas: Art Language and Tools, Understanding Art in Context, Creative Expression in Art, and Valuing Artistic Experience.

Visual Art 40S (VA40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Art 30S

Students will be sophisticated in their understanding and expression of art. Personal preferences are identified and students must be extremely self-motivated and dedicated to their art. Specifically, students will complete a collection of work that is a reflection of the student as an artist. All projects must be accompanied by a proposal, research, sketchbook entries, and artist reflection.

Technology Courses

Computer Science 20S (CS20S - 1 credit)

NOTE: Introduction to Applied and Pre-Calculus Math 20S is STRONGLY RECOMMENDED as co-requisite for this course. 

This course acts as an introduction to computer programming. The basic concepts of programming, including input/output, decision-making, structures, looping, and an introduction to subprograms will be covered using a high-level programming language like C++, Java, and/or Visual Basic. As well, the history of computer hardware, multi-base math, and computer ethics will be discussed. 

Students will be required to write computer programs throughout this course in order to demonstrate their understanding of programming concepts. As well, there will be unit tests on course concepts as a part of assessment. 

This is a fairly in-depth and challenging course; students should be prepared for significant homework. Some of this work is done in class, but some of it will need to be done outside of class time as well. Students will also need their own device to access course software. 

This is the first of three computer science courses offered at Dakota. Students interested in future studies/careers in computer science, math, engineering, science, and commerce should consider taking this course.

Computer Science 30S (CS30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Computer Science 20S (CS20S)

This course continues to explore concepts in computer programming with the programming language(s) first encountered in Computer Science 20S. Further study of subprograms, parameters, arrays, strings, and searching/sorting algorithms are some of the higher-level concepts covered in this course. The history of computer software will also be examined. 

Students will be required to write computer programs throughout this course in order to demonstrate their understanding of programming concepts. As well, there will be unit tests on course concepts as a part of assessment. 

This is a fairly in-depth and mathematical course; students should be prepared for significant homework. Some of this work is done in class, but some of it will need to be done outside of class time as well. Students will also need their own device to access course software. 

This is the second of three computer science courses offered at Dakota. Students interested in future studies/careers in computer science, math, engineering, science, and commerce should consider taking this course.

Computer Science 40S (CS40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Computer Science 30S (CS30S)

This is the final computer science course in high school. As such, it is intended for students interested in continuing their computer science work beyond high school. Multi-dimensional arrays, files, and object-oriented programming are major topics covered in this course. As well, students will learn project management as part of a group programming project and will also be expected to learn another computer language independently. 

Students will be required to write computer programs throughout this course in order to demonstrate their understanding of programming concepts. As well, there will be unit tests on course concepts as a part of assessment. 

This is a fairly in-depth and mathematical course; students should be prepared for significant homework. Some of this work is done in class, but some of it will need to be done outside of class time as well. Students will also need their own device to access course software. 

This is the third of three computer science courses offered at Dakota. Students interested in future studies/careers in computer science, math, engineering, science, and commerce should consider taking this course.

Yearbook I0S & 20S (YB10S, YB20S =  1 credit each year)

The purpose of this course is to allow students to plan and create a variety of published documents using digital photography and desktop publishing techniques. Yearbook provides students with the opportunity to develop skills in a variety of areas including: layout and design, copywriting, journalism, photography and image editing. This course is project-based, as students work together to complete the school yearbook. If you have an interest in photography, design and writing and you want to get involved in your school community, then this course would be a good choice for you. 

Units of study include: Digital Photography, Layout and Design, Copywriting and Project Management. The first semester is spent on skill development in terms of photography assignments for school-based sports activities and groups, software applications (Photoshop, Illustrator, and desktop publishing to name a few), and an introduction to the online Yearbook Creation tools with Friesens Publishing. The second semester is devoted to project management where the students work through additional photography assignments and page design creation activities to produce the Final Yearbook project. 

Students interested in future studies/careers in communications, photography, journalism or graphic design should consider taking this course.

Yearbook  30S & 40S (YB30S, YB40S = 1 credit each year)

Prerequisite: Yearbook (YB10S, YB20S) 

This course will build on the skills and concepts introduced in Yearbook. Students enrolled in this course will be expected to take on an editorial role in one of the yearbook departments. Students will plan and create a variety of published documents using advanced digital photography and desktop publishing design techniques. Yearbook provides students with the opportunity to develop skills in a variety of areas including: layout and design, copywriting, journalism, photography and image editing. This course is project-based, with the main product being the school yearbook. 

Units of study include: Advanced Digital Photography, Layout and Design, Copywriting, Project Management, Leadership and Journalism. 

Students interested in future studies/careers in communications, photography, journalism or graphic design should consider taking this course.  

Dramatic Arts

Dramatic Arts 10S (DA10S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Drama concerns itself with the personal development of the student; physically, emotionally, intellectually, and culturally. This course will touch on basic dramatic skills but will mainly allow the students to learn how to express themselves. We will spend time working together as a group, learning to trust each other and to take risks. 

Students will learn basic improvisation and mime skills and will apply them in small performances. Students will learn how to take a story and adapt it for presentation on the stage. This is not a performance-oriented course. However, the group may decide to perform one of their projects for an audience.

Dramatic Arts 20S (DA20S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

The Drama program concerns itself with the personal development of the student; physically, emotionally, intellectually, and culturally. The emphasis of Drama 20G is process. Through theatre games and improvisation; personal awareness, concentration and group trust are explored.

Improvisation, scriptwriting and scene work follow as the individual develops an understanding of dramatic concepts and skills. This is not a performance oriented course. However, the group may decide to perform one of their projects for an audience. Through drama, students will learn to understand their own experiences and develop greater sensitivity and confidence. Students will learn basic skills in communication, creativity and expression.

Drama 30S (DA30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Drama DR20S

The Drama program concerns itself with the personal development of the student: physically, emotionally, intellectually and culturally. The emphasis of Drama 30S is character. Students will use improvisation and character creation to begin exploration. They will then look at various styles of scripts and scenes and will present these characters to an audience. Through Drama, students will learn to understand their own experiences and develop a greater sensitivity and confidence. Students will work with published scripts as well as original scripts to explore character.  

Drama 40S (DA40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Drama DR30S 

This Drama course focuses on performance. Students will use the skills from Grade 9, 10, and 11 to develop themselves as actors. The course also concerns itself with the personal development of the student: physically, emotionally, intellectually and culturally. Through drama, students will learn to understand their own experience and develop a greater sensitivity and confidence. The 40S class may attend and perform at the Manitoba Drama Youth Festival. 

Musical Theatre Production MT10S MT20S; MT30S; MT40S (1 credit each course)

Prerequisite: Audition process

NOTE: This course will be offered outside of the regular timetable. 

The aim of Musical Theatre is to introduce students to elementary singing, dancing and acting skills. Grades 9 -12 students will work together to produce a full-length musical production. This course will allow students to express and measure their skills in the arts by presenting a musical production for a public audience. Teamwork skills must be stressed to bring the production to the stage. Students will choose to follow one of two streams: production backstage or performance. 

Costs: There may be several fees associated with participating in this class. The class fee for all students is $25. Students will be required to attend a rehearsal retreat. The cost associated with this two day event is approximately $120.00. Participants may also want to purchase t-shirts with the show's logo for approximately $20.00.

Human Ecology

Textiles Arts and Design 10S (TAD10S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Students in Textile Arts and Design 10S will have the opportunity to express individuality, satisfy personal interests, and show creativity in their learning through making a variety of construction projects. Students will learn how to make better decisions when selecting, repairing or caring for clothing products. The individualized practical part of the course offers students the chance to learn new construction techniques and/or build on previous skills. Students will work on a combination of required and student choice projects. The theory portion is done in the form of individual assignments or projects. Regular attendance is essential as most practical work should be done during class time. Materials for most small projects are supplied, but materials for large projects are to be purchased by the student.   

Textile Arts and Design 20S (TAD20S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Textile Arts and Design 20S focuses on our needs, preferences, values and goals as they relate to our clothing and textile choices. The course is primarily a practical course with a small theoretical component. The practical component is self-directed with students working on a combination of required and student choice projects. The theory portion is done in the form of individual assignments or projects. Regular attendance is essential as most practical work should be done during class time. Materials for most small projects are supplied, but materials for large projects are to be purchased by the student.      

Textile Arts and Design 30S (TAD30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Textile Arts and Design 30S focuses on fashions of the past and the study of textiles and consumerism. The course is primarily a practical course with a small theoretical component. The practical component is self-directed with students working on a combination of required and student choice projects. The theory portion is done in the form of individual assignments or projects. Regular attendance is essential as most practical work should be done during class time. Materials for small projects are supplied but materials for large projects are to be purchased by the student. 

Textile Arts and Design 40S (TAD40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Textile Arts and Design 40S focuses on the fashion design industry and designing for special needs. The course is primarily a practical course with a small theoretical component. The practical component is self-directed with students working on a combination of required and student choice projects. The theory portion is done in the form of individual assignments or projects. Regular attendance is essential as most practical work should be done during class time. Students at this level will be required to be self-motivated and will assume responsibility for planning, initiating and justifying some of their own projects. Materials for small projects are supplied but materials for large projects are to be purchased by the student.  

Family Studies 10S (FS10S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Family Studies 10S places an emphasis on the individual within the framework of family and society. Topics for discussion offer students the chance to learn about their own development in relation to their family and their environment. Students will reflect on decisions that affect their relationships and well-being, and that guide them in making positive, healthy decisions. They will also learn valuable skills in communication, conflict resolution, and stress management.  Students should be aware that sensitive issues may be discussed during this course. 

Family Studies 20S (FS20S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Family Studies 20S is a course designed to prepare students for future parenthood, with a focus on the roles, responsibilities and rewards that parenting can bring.  Decision making about parenting and personal care during pregnancy are discussed, as well as the issues surrounding teen pregnancy.  A large portion of the course emphasizes the pregnancy process, looking specifically at prenatal development from the moment of conception, through to the birth of the newborn baby and its development during the first year of life.  Prenatal care, the stages of trimester development and the process of labor and delivery are all topics that will be discussed.  The RealCare® Baby Simulation experience which is also a part of the program, will give students the chance to take out any one of 5 computerized babies.  Experience the life-changing reality of caring for an infant.  This smart baby adds meaning and accountability by using wireless programming to track and report on caregiver behaviors.  This RealCare® Baby experience helps students see what it would really be like to care for a newborn.  Students should be aware that sensitive issues may be discussed during this course. 

Family Studies 30S (FS30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Family Studies 30S focuses on Child Development from the age of one to the beginning of Adolescence. Physical, Intellectual, Emotional, Moral and Social theories of Development of school-aged children are studied and explained.  The rights and responsibilities of parents and caregivers are identified and the appropriate care required for each stage of child development is also described.  In some years a practicum may also be implemented by the teacher. This practicum may include time spent observing and interacting with children in a daycare or elementary school classroom and the planning and implementation of activities for the daycare/school children who may be invited to visit us in the classroom.  Students should be aware that sensitive issues may be discussed during this course. 

Family Studies 40S (FS40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Family Studies 40S focuses on Human Growth and Development through the life span, with Theories of Personality and Character Development being explored.  Personal Development, including analyzing one's Values and Goals and making decisions about the future are also topics of discussion.  Students in Family Studies 40S will also learn about love and relationships from adolescence to adulthood, with an emphasis on understanding all aspects of marriage and family.  Legal and cultural implications of marriage (including divorce and remarriage) will also be discussed.  Students will be expected to work on a mock marriage project, do individual research assignments and participate in small group discussions.  Students should be aware that sensitive issues may be discussed during this course. 

Foods and Nutrition 10S (FN10S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Aspiring to be the next famous chef?  Needing to cook to impress? Want to understand how to make the best food choices for a healthy lifestyle?  This course may be for you. 

The course is designed for all students and will help you throughout your lifetime as you develop and improve your kitchen skills and ability to make nutritious choices.  Topics include portions, menu planning, food choices, health and wellness, and diet related diseases. 

Assessments will include tests, assignments, and projects, daily practical skills in the foods lab, and a final 3-day practical lab exam. 

Foods and Nutrition 20S (FN20S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Interested in becoming a chef?  Or learning about how the major nutrients impact your body to perform at an optimal level? Or are you interested in cooking from scratch and the enjoyment of good food? This course may be for you. 

This course will provide you with basic everyday survival skills that will assist you in maintaining a healthy lifestyle based on current research and knowledge in the field of nutrition.  We will spend time analyzing eating habits in order to explore areas you may need to improve and through the study of the science of food become better-informed consumers whenever you visit the local grocery store, restaurant and read that latest diet craze or advertisement for a super food. 

Assessments will include tests, assignments, and projects, daily practical skills in the foods lab, and a final 3-day practical lab exam. 

Foods and Nutrition 30S (FN30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Interested in getting out of the classroom and harvest fresh foods?   Or the environment and the local food movement in Manitoba?   Or perhaps this year you want to be the healthiest you.  Or are you interested in cooking from scratch and the enjoyment of good food? This course may be for you. 

This course will provide you with the skills needed to make the 200 food related decisions you make each day.  You will be able to evaluate any new diet trend and "superfood" in the media and the skills and confidence to prepare home cooked meals for yourself and others.  Cultural diversity and seasonal and local foods will be celebrated in examining the culinary regions of Canada. 

Assessments will include tests, assignments, and projects, daily practical skills in the foods lab, and a final 3-day practical lab exam. 

Foods and Nutrition 40S (FN40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Interested in how you as a consumer fit into the global community?  Tasting foods from around the world?  Or creating tasting dishes on a $2 budget?  This course is for you.   

We will study the food and traditions surrounding food and  food production in various parts of the world; global, northern and local food security and efforts to alleviate hunger both globally and locally.

Labs will focus on planning and preparing foods from around the world.  You will be trying new and different gourmet foods and trying creative ways to prepare a variety of foods.   

Experiment, Experience, and Enjoy! 

Assessments will include tests, assignments, and projects, daily practical skills in the foods lab, and a final 3-day practical lab exam. 

Industrial Arts

Drafting Design 10G (DT10G - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

This course will appeal to creative students who would enjoy designing a home, creating a new product or inventing a new device. Computers as will be emphasized as tools for developing and implementing design solutions. Pictorial views, design ideas and solutions, and AutoCAD software will be used to visualize designs and to provide a blueprint for constructing models or prototypes. Students will have the opportunity to explore information and practice skills related to careers in drafting and design.  As well, students will be introduced to aspects of graphic arts, to design and create products for both digital and printed work.  Software related to this objective include the use of Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator.  One project for this course is the design of a custom t-shirt.

Drafting Technology 20G (DT20G - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

Drafting Technology 20G is the study and practice of technical drafting, design and drawing.  Specific topics include: sketching, drawing interpretation, pictorial illustration, mechanical drafting, architectural design, and optional topic selections. Students will produce projects in using AutoCAD software. Students will be introduced to construction techniques, and the importance of good drafting design. This course will be of interest to students who are considering a career or have an interest in architecture, engineering, and CADD technologies related to construction drafting.  Projects may include the design of products to be created with a 3D printer, a sublimation printer, and vinyl cutter.

As well, students will be introduced to aspects of graphic arts, to design and create products for both digital and printed work, including an introduction to animation.  Software related to this objective include the use of Adobe Photoshop and Adobe IllustratorProjects for this course is the design and creation of custom apparel, and other products as well.

Electricity / Electronics Technology 10G (EE10G - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

This course will appeal to students who are interested in the functioning of electronic devices and who would like to build electronic projects such as an intrusion alarm to protect property, a moisture meter, or the construction of a tethered Sumobot.  Students will complete assignments designed to provide an exploration of various components of modern electronic equipment and systems. Students will utilize their knowledge to design circuits. Printed circuit board technology will be employed in the construction of a variety of projects. Students will have the opportunity to explore information and practice skills related to careers involving electricity and electronics.

Electricity and Electronics Technology 20G (EE20G - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

This course is intended to provide students with an insight into the electrical-electronic language.  Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of electronic theory and components, and realize their use through a series of labs. Concepts taught are: circuitry, schematic representation, digital meter reading, capacitance, inductance, solid state diodes, and Arduino applications and robotics. DC power will be the main focus of this course.  Students will be required to build several projects to apply their learned skills, which includes a PVC Lamp Term Project.  Project fabrication may include the use of 3D printers, vinyl cutter, and a laser cutter. 

Electricity and Electronics Technology 30G (EE30G - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Electricity and Electronics Technology EE20G 

This course has two aspects — theory and practical. The theory aspect focuses mainly on semiconductors. Components such as diodes and transistors as well as integrated circuits are studied. Emphasis will be placed on AC electrical theory. Students will construct projects from scratch; metal shop skills will be taught and implemented. Opportunities are provided for students to experiment with each device. Students are required to demonstrate a basic knowledge and understanding of the devices, as well as the ability to use them in practical situations. This course includes an introduction to robotics, Surface Mounted Technologies, and renewable energies. 

Applied Technology - Electronics 40S (EE40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Electronics EE30G 

This course has three aspects — theory, practical and industrial processes. The theory aspect focuses on digital circuits. Students study, in considerable depth, topics such as logic design, computer memory and data transmission. Opportunities are provided to experiment with each concept studied. Students are required to apply their knowledge and understanding of the devices to solve problems. The practical aspect of Electronics 40S focuses on the refinement of skills developed in Electronics 20G and 30G as well as printed circuit board design, technical writing and communication. Students are also introduced to: residential wiring and computer controlled machining.

Power Mechanics Technology 10G (PM10G - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

This course will appeal to students who are interested in the functioning of engines and who enjoy working on mechanical equipment. Students will be introduced to 2 and 4 cycle engines. Problem solving skills will be developed through trouble-shooting opportunities. An introduction to machine shop processes including MIG and Oxy-acetylene welding and plasma cutting is also an integral part of this course. Students will have the opportunity to explore information and practice skills related to careers in Power Mechanics.

Power Mechanics Technology 20G (PM20G - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none 

This course is designed as an introduction to the automobile and its various systems. This program is geared toward a basic understanding of how the automobile works and how to inspect, maintain and repair different systems. This course also includes an introduction to machine shop equipment and welding/cutting processes. Some of the topics include: 

  • Safety 
  • Welding 
  • Tires 
  • Tool Identification/usage 
  • Use of major equipment -e.g. Hoists 
  • Engine operation 
  • Vehicle maintenance operation 

Classes will consist of theoretical (classroom based theory) and practical (hands on) content. Students selecting this course should bring with them a keen interest in cars, hand tools, welding, and all aspects of an automotive shop. A strong emphasis on SAFETY will be exercised.

Automotive Technology 30G (PM30G - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Power Mechanics 20G 

This course uses basic knowledge gained in Power Mechanics 20G to take a more in depth look at automotive repair. Some topics to be covered include: 

  • Safety 
  • Cylinder Head Rebuilding 
  • Brakes 
  • Engine Types 
  • Fuel Systems 
  • Steering and Suspension 
  • Tune-Ups

Applied Technology - Automotive 40S (PM40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Automotive Technology 30G 

This course provides an in depth look into engine diagnostic and service. Topics to be covered include: 

  • Automatic Transmission Services
  • Scan Tool Hookup/Troubleshooting 
  • Engine Rebuilding 
  • Computer 
  • Operations and Diagnostics 

This course is set up to allow students to spend much of their time working in the shop for a practical, hands on experience using knowledge from the past 3 years of training.

Languages

French 10F (FR10F - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Grade 8 French 

French 10F is a multidimensional course, which emphasizes the communicative approach to language learning. Using a variety of materials and strategies, the course provides students with the opportunity and the tools to experience the act of communicating in a meaningful way in French. Students should possess basic French reading comprehension when they choose this course. 

Students will be able to: 

  • communicate about daily activities in the present, past and future 
  • ask others questions. 
  • answer questions about the different topics this course covers 
  • state preferences 
  • make directions 
  • describe feelings 
  • express opinions about friends and personalities 
  • read a passage and answer questions about it 
  • spell words correctly as well as communicate orally using the correct sentence formats

French 20F (FR20F - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: French 10F

French 20F is a rich multi-dimensional course, which emphasizes the communicative approach to language learning. Using a variety of materials and strategies, the course provides students with the opportunity and the tools to experience the act of communication in a meaningful way in French. The act of communication involves an exchange of messages through reading and writing as well as speaking and listening. 

Students will be able to: 

  • communicate about daily activities in the present, past and future 
  • ask and answer questions from peers and teacher 
  • read a story, understand it and answer comprehension questions 
  • describe pictures and elaborate on what is shown 
  • express opinions on subjects such as high school 
  • describe pictures 
  • express personal preferences 

French 30S (FR30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: French 20F

French 30S is a multi-dimensional course which emphasizes the communicative approach to language learning. Through the use of a variety of materials and strategies the course provides students with the opportunity and the tools to experience the act of communicating in a meaningful way in French. The act of communication involves an exchange of messages through reading and writing as well as speaking and listening. 

Students will be able to: 

  • make comparisons and contrasts 
  • expand their verb knowledge 
  • listen to spoken conversation and understand what is being said 
  • use the written French language to communicate their thoughts

French 40S (FR40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: French 30S 

French 40S is a multi-dimensional course which emphasizes the communicative approach to language learning. Through the use of a variety of materials and strategies, the course provides students with the opportunity and the tools to experience the act of communicating in a meaningful way in French. The act of communication involves an exchange of messages through reading and writing as well as speaking and listening. 

Students will be able to: 

  • Speak predominantly French during class time 
  • Listen, read and write appropriate level texts in the French language 
  • Continue to expand upon all prior learning at the lower levels

Spanish 10F (SP10F - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Students will learn to speak and comprehend the basic Spanish language from a cultural perspective using various activities and celebrations as the focal point for learning the language.

Spanish 20F (SP20F - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Spanish 10F

Students will use the language through speaking, writing, reading and listening. Learn new vocabulary and grammar necessary for more sophisticated readings and more complex dialogues and be engaged in a variety of activities to foster a better understanding of the language and culture.

English As An Additional Language (EAL11G; EAL21G; EAL31G; EAL41G - 1 credit each)

Prerequisite: Students who speak a language other than English and require additional support in learning the English language (who may or may not be recent newcomers to Canada.)  English as an Additional Language focuses on building English language skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking.  This is a multi-cultural, multi-age classroom that develops language skills.  The program goals are:

  1. To develop and learn English language skills that are necessary to be successful in a Canadian school setting and future workplaces.
  2. To support students in acquiring and becoming more proficient in the English language as they transition into the mainstream high school program in Manitoba.
  3. To help students learn the cultural norms and language of a Canadian classroom and society.
  4. To take part in a variety of field trips that further enrich English language development and build cultural awareness.

Performing Arts

Jazz Band 10S (JB10S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Students may be asked to audition 
This course will be offered outside the regular timetable. To be a member of the jazz band the student must also be a member of the concert band.

This course deals with the idioms of swing, latin and rock. Students will learn topics specific to jazz that include:

  • instrument technique
  • improvisation 
  • jazz history 
  • ear training and rhythm

Jazz Band 20S (JB20S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Students may be asked to audition. 

This course will be offered outside the regular timetable. To be a member of the jazz band the student must also be a member of the concert band. Students must begin with the 10S or 20S level. 

This course deals with the idioms of swing, latin and rock. Students will learn topics specific to jazz that include: instrument technique, improvisation, jazz history, ear training and rhythm. 

Jazz Band 30S (JB30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Jazz Band 20S, students may be asked to audition 

This course deals with the idioms of swing, latin and rock. Students will learn topics specific to jazz that include: 

  • instrument technique
  • improvisation 
  • jazz history 
  • ear training and rhythm 

This course will be offered outside the regular timetable. To be a member of the jazz band the student must also be a member of the concert band.

Jazz Band 40S (JB40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Jazz Band 30S, students may be asked to audition 

This course continues and extends the skills and topics contained in Jazz Band 30S.

Beginner Band 10S (CBB10S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None

This class is offered for anyone wanting to learn to play a band instrument and read music. It is designed for students who have had no prior band experience and can be taken at any grade level. Students will be able to choose an instrument and may select either the flute, clarinet, trumpet, french horn, trombone, tuba, or percussion instruments.  This is a year-long course and students who have completed the course will have the opportunity to enroll in Concert Band 20S. 

Students will also learn to play together in a group/ensemble setting. Through performance students will:

  • learn effective rehearsal techniques 
  • learn instrument technique including articulation, intonation, and phrasing 
  • learn musicality through music concepts such as balance, blend, rhythm, dynamics 
  • get exposed to many styles of music from around the world.
  • learn self-discipline, responsibility, and commitment to the ensemble

Band 10S (CB10S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Experience at the Grade 7/8 level 

Music is a unique experience within the school life of each student. Students will learn to play their instruments at a high level, develop self discipline and learn the value of team work. We hope that each student will become a knowledgeable, perceptive musician and develop a lifelong appreciation of music. 

This course is a continuation of the beginning band experience at the Junior High School level. 

Through performance students will: 

  • develop effective rehearsal techniques 
  • develop instrument technique including articulation, intonation, and phrasing 
  • develop musicality through music concepts such as balance, blend, rhythm, dynamics 
  • develop a broader knowledge and greater appreciation for styles of music other than Pop/Rock
  • develop self discipline, responsibility, and commitment to the ensemble

Band is timetabled every second day over the entire year. 

All courses contribute to the student’s development of instrument technique and musical concepts through performance. Students are expected to participate in all band performances including those outside school and after school hours. These will include the school winter and final concerts and the Optimist Festival. 

Cost: Band fees listed here may change. There are band fees of $15.00 and a uniform rental fee of $25.00.  There is a percussionist fee of $60.00 for the year. Specialized instruments such as tuba, baritone saxophone, euphonium, French horn, bassoon, oboe, and bass clarinet may be rented from the school for $120.00 per year. There is a limited supply of these instruments. All other instruments and equipment must be provided by the student.

Band 20S (CB20S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Band 10S 

Music is a unique experience within the school life of each student. The students will learn to play their instruments at a high level, develop self-discipline, and learn the value of team work. We hope that each student will become a knowledgeable, perceptive musician and develop a lifelong appreciation of music. 

All courses continue through both semesters (September to June). All courses contribute to the student’s development of instrument technique and musical concepts through performance. Students are expected to participate in all band performances (3-4 per year) including those outside of school and after school hours. These will include the school winter and final concerts and the Optimist Festival. 

Cost: Fees listed here may change. There is band fee of $15.00 and a uniform rental fee of $25.00.  There is a percussionist fee of $60.00 for the school year.  Specialized instruments such as tuba, baritone saxophone, euphonium, French horn, bassoon, oboe, and bass clarinet may be rented from the school for $120.00 per year. There is a limited supply of these instruments. All other instruments and equipment must be provided by the students. These fees are to be paid to the student’s Band teacher during the first week of school. 

This course is a continuation of the Music Band 10S course with further emphasis on development at the high school level. Through performance students will: 

  • further develop rehearsal techniques 
  • further develop instrument technique 
  • further develop music concepts 
  • further develop self discipline, responsibility, and commitment to the ensemble 
  • further develop an appreciation for the many styles of music.

Band 30S (CB30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Band 20S

This course is a continuation of the skills and techniques developed at the 20S level. The student will be more involved musically and perform more demanding wind literature. Through performance at an advanced level, students will: 

  • develop advanced rehearsal techniques 
  • develop advanced instrument technique 
  • develop a mature understanding of music concepts 
  • develop a strong work ethic and commitment to the ensemble
  • develop a mature appreciation for the many styles of music

Band 40S (CB40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Band 30S 

This course is a continuation of the skills and techniques developed at the 30S level. The student will continue to be more involved musically and perform more demanding wind literature. Through performance at a more advanced level, students will: 

  • further develop advanced rehearsal techniques 
  • further develop advanced instrument technique 
  • further develop a mature understanding of music concepts 
  • further develop a mature attitude and a strong work ethic
  • further develop a mature appreciation for the many styles of music

Wind Ensemble 20S (WE20S - 1 credit)

Corequisite: Students must be registered in Musical Band 20S and may be asked to audition. 

This course may be offered outside the regular timetable. This course is designed for those musicians who wish to challenge themselves with more complex literature. Members of the Wind Ensemble must also be a member of the concert band. Students who wish to tour will be encouraged to participate.

Students will perform music at an advanced level and will: 

  • develop a mature approach to rehearsals 
  • develop mature instrument technique 
  • develop a mature appreciation of music concepts 
  • develop a mature sense of responsibility to the ensemble and one’s personal growth

Wind Ensemble 30S (WE30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Wind Ensemble 20S, students may be asked to audition 

This course continues and extends the skills and topics contained in Wind Ensemble 20S. This course is designed for those musicians who wish to challenge themselves with more complex literature. To be a member of the Wind Ensemble the student must also be a member of the concert band.

Wind Ensemble 40S (WE40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Wind Ensemble 30S, students may be asked to audition 

This course continues and extends the skills and topics contained in Wind Ensemble 30S.

Choral Music 10S (CC10S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: An interest in singing 

This course will be offered outside the regular timetable. This course focuses on the development of vocal technique, listening skills and knowledge of choral scores leading to expressive singing. Emphasis will be placed on rehearsal and performance. The choir may perform at many times throughout the year including appearances at: ChoralFest, Choral Celebration, Out of town/province music tours, partner school visits, Winter Concert, Final concert. 

Special Note: Choral music 10S is an all year course which meets on alternating days. Students in the choral program, at any level may audition to be a member of the Vocal Jazz program.

Choral Music 20S (CC20S - 1 credit for both semesters)

Prerequisite: Music Choral 10S, or by audition 

This course will be offered outside the regular timetable. This course focuses on the development of vocal technique, listening skills and knowledge of choral scores leading to expressive singing. Emphasis will be placed on rehearsal and performance. The choir may perform at many times throughout the year including appearances at: ChoralFest, Choral Celebration, out of town/province music tours, partner school visits, Winter concert, Final concert. 

Special Note: Choral music 20S is an all year course which meets on alternating days. Students in the choral program, at any level may audition to be a member of the Vocal Jazz program.

Choral Music 30S (CC30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Choral 20S or by audition 

This course is a continuation of the Music Choral 20S course with increased expectations. 

Choral Music 40S (CC40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Choral 30S or by audition 

This course is a continuation of the Music Choral 30S course with increased expectations. 

Vocal Jazz 20S (VJ20S - 1 credit for both semesters)

Corequisite: Students must be registered in Choir
The vocal jazz ensemble explores various styles of vocal jazz repertoire, including jazz, pop, and a cappella. Students interested in joining vocal jazz registration in Concert Choir is preferred.

Vocal Jazz 30S (VJ30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Vocal Jazz 20S
This course is a continuation of the Vocal Jazz 20S course with increased expectations.

Vocal Jazz 40S (VJ40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Vocal Jazz 30S
This course is a continuation of the Vocal Jazz 30S course with increased expectations. 

Guitar 10S (GU10S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Grade 8 Guitar or an interest in learning Guitar 

Guitar 10S begins at an introductory level and progresses at a fast pace to higher levels. This course provides the opportunity to explore many different styles of music on the instrument. Students will begin by using a classical finger style technique and learn to read musical notation in first position. More systems of reading music (TAB, numbers, letters, and ear) are also explored. 

This will be followed by a focus on chords, bass lines, lead patterns as well as an introduction to various guitar related topics (Open tuning, Guitar types and Guitarists). Students are expected to participate in any mandatory performance opportunities. 

All students are required to pay a $20.00 fee at the start of the year for use of a school owned guitar during school hours. These guitars cannot be taken out of the school. The fee covers only normal wear and string replacement.

Guitar 20S (GU20S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Grade 9 Guitar 

The content of Guitar 20S will focus on varied elements of basic guitar playing skills. Some of these elements will include: performance, composition/song writing, music theory and technical skill development. This course will begin using a methodology focusing on classical finger style technique and progresses to a contemporary pick style approximately midway through the course. The course will start with reading only proper musical notation, but also touch on other systems of music notation (TAB, Letter name, Number systems and Internet notation). 

All students are required to pay a $20.00 fee at the start of the year for use of a school owned guitar during school hours. These guitars cannot be taken out of the school. The fee covers only normal wear and string replacement.

Guitar 30S (GU30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Guitar 20S, Grade 10 Guitar or audition 

This course is designed to help students to continue the development of the skills and techniques from the 20S level. Students will continue to further develop fine motor skills and reading skills as a music student. 

All students are required to pay a $20.00 fee at the start of the year for use of a school owned guitar during school hours. The fee covers only normal wear and string replacement. 

Guitar 40S (GU40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Guitar 30S or audition 

This course is designed to help students to continue the development of the skills and techniques from the 30S level.

All students are required to pay a $20.00 fee at the start of the year for use of a school owned guitar during school hours. The fee covers only normal wear and string replacement. 

Leadership

Recreational and Athletic Leadership 31G (PE31G - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Grade 10 Physical Education. (Students often are recommended by their grade 10 Physical Education teachers.)

This elective course is designed for students who wish to study leadership development at an intense level as it relates to athletics. Students will be responsible for seeking out a group(s) within the school and/or community in which to take an active leadership role to complete his/her leadership practicum. This course does not replace Grade 11 physical education. 

Students will study the following areas: 

  • leadership development and styles 
  • level 1 Introduction to Coaching certification 
  • teaching 
  • human anatomy 
  • human physiology 
  • nutrition 
  • athletic therapy (Manitoba Athletic Therapy Association First Aider certification level 1) 
  • fitness programming 
  • lifetime activities

Cost for Grade 11 Class is $50.00

Recreational and Athletic Leadership 41G (PE41G - 1 credit)

 Prerequisite: Students often are recommended by their PE31G teacher. 

This course is a continuation of the goals and objectives of the Recreational and Athletic Leadership 31G course. This course does not replace Grade 12 physical education. 

The areas of study include: 

  • leadership 
  • development (school or community involvement) 
  • level 2 introduction to Coaching certification 
  • plan and implement an 8 week personal training program 
    · seasonal coaching plan 
  • school or community group fitness consultation 
  • 6 week personal nutrition evaluation 
  • school or community nutrition consultation 
  • athletic therapy (Manitoba Athletic Therapy Association level 2 On Site Athletic First Aider) 
  • event planning of lifetime activities

Cost for grade 12 class is $50.00

Science (Electives)

Biology 30S (B30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Science 20F 

Biology 30S offers an introductory study of human anatomy, physiology, wellness and homeostasis. The course is divided into six units and two overall themes; wellness and homeostasis. Wellness refers to the connectedness or balance between the different aspects of a person's life that makes them "well' including; physical [health], spiritual, emotional, intellectual, social and environmental parts of a person's life. Homeostasis refers to keeping constant conditions within the body in response to internal and external changes in the environment. 

Units: 

  • Wellness and Homeostasis: Includes a review of cells, but focuses on how material moves in and out of cells
  • Digestion and Nutrition: Includes biochemistry of foods we eat, nutrition and the digestive system
  • Transportation: Includes both the respiratory and circulatory systems
  • Excretion and Waste Management: Focuses on the urinary system
  • Protection and Control: Includes the immune and nervous systems
  • Wellness and Homeostatic Changes: Includes societal and ethical issues related to controlling our wellness, death and dying 

 

Students considering Biology 30S should have successfully completed Science 20F, with a minimum final grade of 65% [recommended]. Biology uses a lot of new vocabulary while exploring the structures and functions of the human body. Students who will be successful in Biology 30S will need to have developed good study skills, critical thinking skills and problem solving abilities. Students will be expected to complete homework and/or be studying classroom materials daily. 

Students in Biology 30S will be assessed through the following methods; labs, daily assignments, tests and a final exam. Students may also be assessed through the use of journals, quizzes, projects, debates, online assignments, presentations and diagrams. 

Upon the successful completion of Biology 30S, students will be better prepared for the rigors of Biology 40S. 

Biology 40S (B40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Science 20F, Biology 30S strongly recommended 

The 40S Biology course is taught in four units with two overarching themes – Genetics and Biodiversity.

Units: 

  • Understanding Biological Inheritance: Heredity and how traits are inherited, as well as genetic diseases and their patterns of inheritance.
  • Mechanisms of Inheritance: Mechanisms of inheritance, chromosomes, DNA, RNA and protein synthesis as well as gene control.
  • Organizing Biodiversity: The nature of classification systems and evidence used to classify organisms. Conservation and sustainability are also explored.
  • Evolutionary Theory and Biodiversity: Darwin's theory of evolution and the development of new species how species adapt to changes in their environment.

 

Biology 40S is a difficult course and students who successfully complete it have well developed study skills and appreciate the need for keeping up with daily assignments. It is a content based curriculum and therefore requires a lot of organization, constant reviewing and studying of new material. A variety of assessment strategies are used that include written tests and quizzes, lab write-ups, research assignments, class presentations and daily work assignments. It should be noted that this course is intended for those students who have a passion for biology and/or plan to attend university. 

Although it is not a required course, students considering Biology 40S are strongly advised to have completed Biology 30S. Furthermore, in several instances, Biology 40S is now listed as required for several university faculties whereas previously it was listed as recommended only. These would include pharmacy, medicine, environmental science, physical therapy and agricultural sciences. 

Biology 40S is a prerequisite for the AP Biology. 

Chemistry 30S (C30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Science 20F 

Chemistry 30S is an introductory course in the study of matter and the changes it undergoes. Students will continue to develop their laboratory skills and build upon their understanding of how chemistry applies to their daily lives. The course is divided into five units. 

Units: 

  • Physical Properties of Matter: Describing the states of matter and the changes they undergo
  • Gases and the Atmosphere: Describing the behaviour of gases and its applications in everyday life
  • Solutions: Describing the formation of solutions and the effects of temperature on solubility
  • Chemical Reactions: Describing types of chemical reactions and an introduction to the fundamentals of chemical calculations
  •  Organic Chemistry: Describing the structure and use of different classes of organic compounds

 

Students in Chemistry 30S will be assessed through the following methods; labs, daily assignments, tests, and a final exam. Students may also be assessed through the use of quizzes, projects, online assignments, presentations and diagrams.

Chemistry 30S directly builds on skills from the chemistry unit in Science 20F. Therefore, only students who successfully completed the chemistry unit in Science 20F are recommended to continue with Chemistry 30S. Students considering Chemistry 30S should have successfully completed Science 20F, with a minimum final grade of 65% [recommended] and have strong mathematical skills. Introduction to Applied and Pre-calculus Math is strongly recommended, with a mark over 65%. Students must have a good working knowledge of algebra. Students will be expected to complete homework and/or be studying class content daily. A good work ethic is needed to succeed in this course. 

Chemistry 40S (C40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Chemistry 30S 

Chemistry 40S is an advanced course in which students broaden their knowledge of chemistry and refine and build their laboratory skills. The program is a continuation of Chemistry 40S and is particularly useful for students who are considering going into a health care profession, engineering or a science based field. The course is divided into six units.

Units: 

  • Atomic Structure: Increases students' understanding of the atomic model and the organization of the periodic table
  • Aqueous Reactions: Introducing three types of reactions that occur in water
  • Kinetics: Describing the rate of chemical reactions
  • Equilibrium: Describing reversible reactions both qualitatively and quantitatively
  • Acids and Bases: Describing acidic and basic equilibria
  • Electrochemistry: Describing the functioning of electrochemical cells

 

Students considering Chemistry 40S should have successfully completed Chemistry 30S, with a minimum final grade of 65% [recommended] and have strong mathematical skills. Pre-calculus and/or Applied Math is strongly recommended, with a mark over 70%. Students must have a strong working knowledge of algebra. 

Students who will be successful in Chemistry 40S should have a strong mathematical background, and will need to have good study skills, critical thinking skills, problem solving abilities. Students will be expected to complete homework and/or be studying class content daily. A good work ethic is needed to succeed in this course. 

Students in Chemistry 40S will be assessed through the following methods; labs, daily assignments, tests, and a final exam. Students may also be assessed through the use of quizzes, projects, presentations and diagrams. 

Chemistry 40S is a prerequisite for AP Chemistry. 

Physics 30S (P30S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Science 20F 

Physics 30S is a course that explores the natural phenomena of how and why particles and waves move using non-calculus mathematics. Physics 30S is to be taken before Physics 40S and both are intended to be university entrance courses. Studying physics can lead to a career in physics research, engineering, health care and medicine, meteorology and air traffic control to name only a few. 

Units: 

  • Kinematics: The mathematics of motion
  • Dynamics: The forces of motion
  • Fields: Gravity, electricity, and magnetism
  • Waves: Mechanical and electromagnetic wave properties
  • Light: A wave and a particle

Physics 30S is an introductory physics course which uses math as a tool for exploring relationships in nature. Students should have completed Science 20F with a strong mark (over 65% is recommended) and have good mathematical skills. Introduction to Applied and Pre-calculus Math is strongly recommended, with a mark over 70%. Students must have a good working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. 

Due to the volume of material covered, students should expect regular homework assignments and must have above average study skills. Students should be committed to a small amount of time each evening (30 minutes) to review their notes from the day’s class and complete homework. Assessment will be done through laboratory experiments, assignments, quizzes, unit tests and a final exam.

Physics 40S (P40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Physics 30S 

Physics 40S continues where Physics 30S left off and goes into greater depth in the mathematical exploration of relationships in nature. Physics 40S is a university entrance course that is intended to prepare students for studying in such fields as physics, engineering, medicine and meteorology. 

Units: 

  • Mechanics: Kinematics, dynamics, momentum, projectile motion, circular motion, and work/energy
  • Fields: Planetary mechanics and gravity
  • Medical Physics: Diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy
  • Electricity: Electrostatics, circuits and electromagnetic induction 

Physics 40S is a demanding course with a significant emphasis on mathematics. Students should have completed Physics 30S with a strong mark (over 70% is recommended) and have good mathematical skills. Pre-calculus and/or Applied Math is strongly recommended, with a mark over 70%. Students must have an excellent working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. 

Due to the volume of material covered, students should expect regular homework assignments and must have above average study skills. Students should be committed to spending at least 30 minutes each evening to review their notes from the day’s class and complete homework. Assessment will be done through laboratory experiments, assignments, quizzes, unit tests and a final exam. 

Physics 40S is a prerequisite for AP Physics. 

Social Studies

Canadian Law 40S (LA40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none

This course includes an overview of law in general and of specific aspects of the Canadian legal system. The focus is on basic principles of law in the various areas and on the structures and processes of the legal-judicial system. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the basic elements of law and how our laws are interpreted and applied in the society in which we live. 

Units of study include: History of Law, Nature and Necessity of Law, Criminal Law, Human and Civil Rights. Course study will include: readings, case studies, reviewing related films and documentaries, note-making, presentations, field trips, debates and guest speakers. 

Students interested in future studies/careers in law, psychology, political science or history should consider this course. Law 40S is also an excellent option for any student who wants to learn more about how the Canadian legal system works and discuss current issues such as Charter rights, the history of Canadian law, and crime and punishment.

Canada 180° 40S (CDN40S)

Prerequisite: none 

This course focuses on histories and herstories of Canada, formally known as Turtle Island. You will explore traditions, cultures, colonization, decolonization, varying worldviews, Canadian Cultural Genocide, all of which have come together to shape different viewpoints on contemporary Canada. 

This is an interactive course which utilizes daily discussions, guest speakers, panel discussions and field trips to engage students in various past and current issues in Canada and the world.  Students will be responsible for completing regular journaling assignments to reflect upon their learning. Students will also critically analyze print, video, audio, and performance pieces to identify and explore topics pertaining Colonization and Indigenous Peoples in Canada and around the world.  There are opportunities in this course for students to direct the course of study. 

This course will assist students in various fields of post-secondary study. Career connections include: justice and law enforcement, social worker, medical professionals, politician, teacher, and jobs in the Social Sciences.

Psychology 40S (PY40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none (A strong mark in Grade 11 History 30F is strongly recommended.) 

This course is designed to introduce students to the social science discipline of Psychology. Introductory principles are covered as students investigate topics such as: 

  • research methods 
  • biopsychology (sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, stress, coping and health) 
  • developmental psychology 
  • cognitive psychology (learning, memory, thinking and language) 
  • variations in individual and group behaviour. 

This course provides opportunities for students to augment communication skills and empathy in interpersonal relationships by promoting a greater understanding of human behaviour. Students will be expected to represent their learning visually, orally and in writing through regular class discussion and debate, journal writing, case studies, text work, tests, presentations, group work, term papers and projects. Several assignments involve making connections to current issues and media. 

This is a literacy-based course, designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in these topics in greater detail. The reading and writing demands require students to have good note-taking skills and the desire to complete independent study. This course is designed for students who plan on enrolling in some post-secondary education and is recommended to students who are pursuing social sciences, law enforcement, social work, management, or education. 

History of Rock and Roll 40S (HRR40S - 1 credit)

Prerequisite: none

This course is offered to students in grades 11 and 12. The general objective is to support students as they construct an understanding of the development of 'rock and roll' through the twentieth century to the present. Connections will be made between the socio-cultural and political climate of various decades and popular music. Rock's influence on society, fashion, lifestyle, and attitudes will be explored. There will be opportunities to focus on significant genres and artists by listening to, researching, and analyzing music; viewing documentaries and film; small group and class discussions; and various creative projects.  Assessment for this course will include projects and assignments such as journals/reflections, song analysis, response questions, seminars, research, and presentations. Rock enthusiasts welcome, no musical talent required!

History of Western Civilization 40G or 40S (H40G; H40S - 1 credit each)

Prerequisite: History 30F (see below for additional advice on choosing between 40G and 40S) 

Canadian citizens today are active participants in a wide range of international affairs. Knowledge and understanding of the development of European nations can augment that participation. Since many of the nations of the world have evolved from European Colonization, a study of the political, economic and social growth of European nations can provide a deeper knowledge and understanding of today’s world. 

Some of the issues and topics that will be explored include: Prehistoric Societies; Classical Civilizations (Greece & Rome); The Middle Ages; The Renaissance (Monarchies, Absolutism & Reformation); Revolutions that changed Western Society; Europe in the World Wars and the Cold War.

Students registering for this course should have an interest in history, especially European civilization, and enjoy class discussions about various historical viewpoints. 

Students registering for the History 40S class can expect activities such as note-taking; seminar presentations; preparing & writing discussion papers; article reviews and group presentations. Additionally, students will develop research skills which will culminate in a formal historical thesis term paper. Throughout the term, students will be asked to complete work with minimal supervision and can expect to be given homework assignments and lectures which will prepare them for interactive class activities. This course is designed for students who are planning on entering a post-secondary institution.

Students registering for the History 40G class can expect activities such as note-taking; preparing and writing discussion papers; article reviews and class debates and discussions. The use of multi-media will be a centre-piece of this course. In general, these learning activities will mostly take place in – class with less emphasis placed on homework. This course is designed for students who are interested in history but likely won’t be pursuing studies at the University level.

Global Issues: Citizenship and Sustainability 40S or 40G (WI40S; WI40G - 1 credit each)

In general, Social Studies examines human societies and the complex interactions of human beings living together in a shared world. In the Global Issues course, students can explore the social, political, environmental and economic impact of a variety of contemporary and emerging issues that we face today. 

Throughout this course, students will explore and develop a greater understanding of the following:

  • The importance of developing a critical and reflective approach to news and world events
  • The interrelationship and implications of local, national and world events on our lives and lives of others around the world.

In light of this, an interest in following topics that currently dominate news headlines around the world, is a definite asset.

Due to the nature of the course, the specific topics will be somewhat fluid and will vary according to the interests of the class and the timing of certain news events.  That said, issues related to politics, the environment and media literacy will form the foundation of the course. 

In Global Issues, there is an expectation that students will come to class prepared, by having read or watched assigned course materials and that they will participate actively in classroom discussions and activities. Course work will involve regular class discussion and debate, readings and case studies, multi-media presentations and group work.  There will be a major project that will require attention, both within and outside of class time.

This course is designed for students who are interested in engaging in active citizenship through discussion and research related to real issues affecting their world. Students will benefit from studies in Global Issues by developing an appreciation for how the recent past has shaped the modern world in which they will be asked to participate.

Advanced Placement Courses

More information on Advanced Placement courses available here.

AP Biology 42S (B42S)

Prerequisite: Biology 40S 

This course is the equivalent of first year introductory college course in Biology. It covers the following major concept areas: Molecules and Cells; Heredity and Evolution, Organisms and Populations. It includes a number of recommended Laboratory Investigations to augment and extend the scope of the curriculum outcomes. Students who successfully take this course will earn an additional high school credit at the 40S level.

In May, the students are given the opportunity to challenge the Advanced Placement College Board Examination. Taking this exam is not compulsory but those students who successfully challenge the examination and receive a mark of 4 or 5 out of 5 can use their grade to apply for credit at many Canadian and American universities and colleges. In particular, students applying to the U of M can earn credit for BIOL 1020 (3): Biology 1 and BIOL 1030 (3): Biology 2. Students applying to the University of Winnipeg can earn credit BIOL-1115/3 Cells and Cellular Process and BIOL-1116/3 Evolution, Ecology and Biodiversity. 

Introduction to Calculus (MICAM40S) / Advanced Math 45S (MIC42U-DCP)

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus Math 40S (recommend 85% or higher) 

The intent of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to challenge the University of Manitoba, Introduction to Calculus, Math 1500 course and receive university credit.  This course will introduce all key aspects of introductory calculus and provide students with excellent background knowledge and exam preparation.  For students not challenging the university exam, the course will allow them to gain awareness and an introduction of the material before attempting calculus in university.

The University of Manitoba requires that students achieve a mark of at least 85% in Pre-Calculus Math 40S before the dual credit course can be attempted.  Students are encouraged to complete Pre-Calculus Math 40S during their grade 11 year but this is not necessary.  Students not successful in achieving 85% in Pre-Calculus Math 40S, may still take the calculus course, but they will not be allowed to take the university exam for the dual credit.  All students in the course will write term tests at Dakota Collegiate and all will receive a high school credit.  Those writing the dual credit exam will receive an additional three credit hours from the University of Manitoba. 

The dual credit course involves writing a midterm exam and a final exam at the university. 

The cost for this program includes a registration fee and a course fee.  This cost, or a portion of, may be covered by the Louis Riel School Division.

Students entering the University of Winnipeg can transfer the half credit from the University of Manitoba to the University of Winnipeg.

AP Chemistry 42S (C42S)

Prerequisite: Chemistry 40S 

This course is the equivalent of first year introductory college course in chemistry. It covers the following major concept areas: Atomic Structure and Bonding, Properties of Matter, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Equilibrium and Thermodynamics. The course includes a number of recommended Laboratory Investigations which will include structured and guided inquiry formats to augment and extend the scope of the curriculum outcomes

In May, the students are given the opportunity to challenge the Advanced Placement College Board Examination. Taking this exam is not compulsory but those students who successfully challenge the examination and receive a mark of 4 or 5 out of 5 can use their grade to apply for credit at many Canadian and American universities and colleges. The Exam consists of multiple choice questions and a series of comprehensive problems and essay topics. Students who successfully take this course will earn an additional full high school credit at the 40S level. 

Students applying to the U of M can earn credit for CHEM 1300 (3) and CHEM 1310 (3). Students applying to the University of Winnipeg can earn credit CHEM-1111/3 Introduction to the Chemical Properties of Matter and CHEM-1112/3 Basic Principles of Chemical Reactivity.

AP History 42S (H42S) Online

Prerequisite: History 30S 

Advanced Placement World History is a university-level survey course with an emphasis on Asian, African, European, and American history. The focus will be on the big picture, using a global perspective to analyze the ways in which people and societies have been connected through time. 

AP World History follows a chronological approach in covering the history of civilization from prehistoric times through the twenty-first century in five units of study: 

  • Technological and Environmental Foundation, to 600 B.C.E (3 weeks) 
  • Organizations and Reorganization of Human Societies, 600 B.C.E-600 C.E (3 weeks) 
  • Regional and Transregional Interactions, 600 C.E-1450 (7 weeks) 
  • Global Interactions, 1450-1750 (6 weeks) 
  • Industrialization and Global Integration, 1750-1900 (6 weeks) 
  • Accelerating Global Change and Realignments, 1900-Present (6 weeks) 

AP Physics 42S (P42S)

Prerequisite: Physics 40S 

AP Physics I is equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It also introduces electric circuits. This course provides a foundation for students in the life sciences, pre-medicine, and some applied sciences as well as other fields not directly related to science. 

In May, students are given the opportunity to challenge the Advanced Placement College Board examination. This examination is not compulsory, but those students who successfully challenge the examination and receive a mark of 4 or 5 out of 5 can use their grade to apply for credit at many Canadian and American universities and colleges. More commonly, students who take AP courses in high school report that the course was excellent preparation for the pace, difficulty, and expectations they faced in university. For this reason, AP courses are recommended for any student planning on doing university science, math, or engineering programs. 

 
 
 
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